Considering the fact that Looking for Alaska was John Green’s debut book; I was stupefied by the way it has been written. It refreshed my list of favourite authors and John Green is visible on it again. However, this book made me realize one very important fact about writing a book: Only good writing is not enough to make a really good book.

The Room on the Roof is about Rusty, a sixteen-year-old Anglo-Indian boy in Dehra and his quest on the answer to the question of “Where do I really belong?” The book does not necessarily answer this question for Rusty. Or for you. However, it has enough food for thought.

These tales, as you can probably figure out, include Gods (not much of Goddesses), sages, kings (but not much of queens), king’s daughters (princesses), and their husbands (mostly princes), curses, boons, sacrifices, animals who can talk, royal marriages, friendships, pride, demons, herdsman, ghosts, fairies, and mortal humans.

This book goes on talking about many such issues that considered a hush-hush affair in almost every Indian household. This book jumps from one issue to another swiftly. Just like we fall into those dark pits, without knowing so ourselves, and only realizing it after we’re somewhat lost.